How braces are put on makes a difference!

We position the braces when the patient is at home! Each tooth gets a bracket which must be placed in the exact  spot on each tooth.  This is actually impossible to do on the first try and this is one of the reasons that braces take as long as they do.  We place brackets on models in the laboratory.  This means they can be placed more accurately.  Small plastic trays  then transfer the positions established in the lab to the teeth. This is called Indirect Bonding.  Only a small percentage of orthodontists have mastered this technique.  What more accurate placement means to you is fewer long morning appointments, shorter time in braces, and a higher quality end result.  Every orthodontist that we know has tried this technique and then given up due to the learning curve involved.  Like anything worthwhile, it takes time to master it.  We have been doing Indirect Bonding on every patient for 20 years, and it is well worth it!

          Accurate bracket positioning in the lab.

           Accurate transfer of bracket positioning.

Larger Overbites 

There are two ways to treat an overbite.  The first is to push the top back and the second is to push the bottom forward.  Pushing the bottom forward can result in poor alignment of the jaw joint, and many orthodontists even believe that this can lead to headaches later in life.  For this reason, we only push the top back.  It used to be that the patient needed to wear a headgear to do this.  Now we routinely push the tops back with “temporary anchor devices” (tad’s). This is the latest buzz in orthodontics.  Tad’s are small mini-implants which received FDA approval in 2006.  They have been used in S. Korea for 40 years. Similar to a headgear, tad’s give orthodontists something to push or pull against besides other teeth:

         

Above photos show a severe overbite corrected by pushing the upper teeth back with temporary anchor devices.  This can be done routinely and without use of a headgear and without use of appliances which re-posture the lower jaw into a forward position.  For more information, google “temporary anchor devices orthodontics”.

Open Bites

   In almost all circumstances, when the teeth are apart in front, the correction should be made by “intruding” the molars.  This means moving the upper teeth upwards and moving the lower teeth downwards.  

         

Above photos show correction of a severe anterior open bite where we used 4 tad’s.  Two in the palate to intrude the upper molars and two near the lower molars to intrude the lower molars.  This allows the lower jaw to swing closed until the front teeth contact.  Trying to pull the front teeth down with rubber bands would have been both unstable and unaesthetic.  In the past this type of movement would require a surgical procedure to accomplish.  Dr. Nisson has been using tad’s for 10 years and we now use them routinely for correcting overbites, anterior open bites and other challenging situations.   

What we’re all about!

At Nisson Orthodontics, we believe that every patient deserves to come away from their orthodontic treatment with the beautiful, healthy smile they deserve.  We don’t have a lot of gimmicks and games and prizes here.  At Nisson Orthodontics, our energies and resources are focused on providing the highest quality orthodontic care possible.  The challenge in orthodontics is to have the teeth stay straight after the appliances come off.  This means a lot more than just wearing retainers.  It means paying attention to details and getting the bite right!  Our goal is to have the teeth stay straight without a retainer!   The staff is highly trained and capable.  Expect a lot of one on one time with just the Dr. and with patient with Nisson Orthodontics.